Saturday, April 16, 2016

Court cases coming out of my ears

(Image: Logo from District court penalty notice)


(Image: list of monies owing ... sigh)


I've been a busy little curial bee already this April what with the pre-pre-trial via telephone, linking me to proceedings in the Adelaide Magistrates Court followed by the Waverley call-over for my AFP bicycle matter.

As a result of all that I have two new dates for two new court appearances:

$$$ 21st June 2016 - Adelaide Magistrates Court
$$$ 15th August 2016 - Sydney (somewhere)

... but what I'm still really smarting over is last month's experience in the Newcastle District Court.

Apart from being dismissed out of hand by the judge (only to be expected I suppose - this is Australia after all) it was the 'pre' bit before the judge made her entrance into the court that has left me particularly cold.

Once the court-room doors had been opened that morning of my matter, I had gone in and sat down in the public-seating area of the court. Shuffling my papers in an attempt to get psychologically and physically prepared, I was aware of another would-be criminal alongside me (we tend to flock together us 'crims') going through the same sort of pre-match process.

It appeared that we might be the only two to be heard that morning, and we were completely outnumbered by lawyers sitting at their exclusive table just in front of us. These officers of the court were utterly oblivious to our presence, and once I was neatly folded and sorted along with my papers, I couldn't help but tune into their conversation, and it crossed my mind that doctors have been sued for less.

It was astounding - with nary a care that two of us in the tiny court were not part of their circle and really ought not to be privvy to their gossip, colleagues and clients were discussed at great length and in great detail.

After a while the bewigged one got up and left the court leaving the suited ones to continue. One of the legal-suits asked one of the DPP solicitors if she had much on that morning to which she replied not really except for a bicycle helmet matter.

Well that got them all excited and there was a lot of 'loose-lips-sink-ships' chat like 'not that woman who ...' and then suddenly another of the DPP solicitors had a 'there's-a-boom-up-there' moment, and employing glorious elocution techniques pronounced slowly and carefully that:

'Mrs - Abbott - is - in - the - court' ... ahhh lovely

... and then watching them all scurry to try and find some semblance of professionalism was nauseatingly pathetic ... sigh.

There is no access to justice via law courts, and there is no access to good manners via lawyers. I would get a better hearing if I was a 'wife-basher.'

Everyone paid by the legal system that day was annoyed with me - as far as they were all concerned, my quest in petitioning for a redress of a grievance was just an exercise in wasting court time.

Careless chatter, arrogance, entitlement, insensitivity, obliviousness to surroundings and other people, I'm sorry but I expect more from my justice system.

7 comments:

  1. Ah Australie, land of superflous laws & limited justice.

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  2. Sue,

    You're doing well exposing the worst human traits in those the rest of us have to rely on i.e. magistrates, lawyers, police, so-called cycling "advocates" and the wackademic pro-MHL "road safety researchers", all of whom suckle greedily on the public teat.

    I hope to catch up with you again in Adelaide in June; just a pity about the circumstances.

    All the best,
    Jim

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  3. Sue,

    You're doing well exposing the worst human traits in those the rest of us have to rely on i.e. magistrates, lawyers, police, so-called cycling "advocates" and the wackademic pro-MHL "road safety researchers", all of whom suckle greedily on the public teat.

    I hope to catch up with you again in Adelaide in June; just a pity about the circumstances.

    All the best,
    Jim

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  4. Our legal system has the standards, critical thinking, and behaviour morals of the typical hairdresser.

    (Sorry to insult our hairdressers)

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  5. Bloody awful. I suppose you can take some small comfort in knowing that they are twits.

    Good on you, Sue.

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  6. My hairdresser has far higher standards, capacity for critical thinking and behaviour than those overeducated non-thinking idiots.

    He also has to deal with my hair, also thick and kinky... I'm sure he's been tempted to get out the garden shears.

    Today will be the first day I ride bareheaded up here. No need for one of my many bérets, or the woolly winter hat.

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  7. Sue, here's a bit of a workout for your French: http://www.lapresse.ca/debats/chroniques/patrick-lagace/201604/24/01-4974473-redecouvrir-la-beaute-du-monde.php about the generalisation of all the Indigenous peoples of Canada as "Autochtones" (Aboriginals), when of course each people and group has its own name. And the rest of the merde which is so similar to chez vous at the other end of the earth.

    ReplyDelete